Monthly Archives: August 2009

Cakes at the 5th Anniversary Party

Remember the amazing cake made for OSMs birthday the other week? Well I somewhat rashly promised a bottle of champagne for anyone who did something similar at the London party, so of course two people brought cakes.

Check out the videos of Matt and Greg’s efforts in this youtube video (which will also show up as a podcast video if your subscribed). Topics vary away from just cakes on to broader OSM subjects, and the very fun living with dragons. YouTube is still processing the video so check back if it’s not working yet.

Thanks to Clark Asay

Clark Asay

Clark Asay helps the Foundation with many issues around the license transition and couldn’t be at the State of the Map conference in Amsterdam last month for all the fun in-person discussions around it. So we thought we’d print a map and have the attendees sign it as a note of thanks. And here we are, so thanks Clark!

What do people edit with?

OSM Editors

Check out the map above that RichardF highlighted in this post some time ago. It shows OSM data coloured by the editor software. Blue is potlatch, red is josm, green is merkaartor and grey is anything (say, JOSM or imports) since not all editors declare themselves there is an ‘everything else’ category. And of course it was built by the eponymous Matt.

OSM on the front page of Wired

Check it out!

Last month, when Zack Ajmal was planning a vacation to Italy, he set out to find the first thing that a traveler would need in a foreign land: a map. But digital maps of Rome and Venice for his Garmin GPS device cost almost $100. So instead, Ajmal turned to OpenStreetMap, a community-driven maps database.

β€œIt worked out pretty well,” the Atlanta-based engineer says. β€œI found Open MTB, which had outdoor hiking and cycling maps with not just roads information, but also trails, short cuts and little known routes.”

MetaPlaces in San Jose

Check out the MetaPlaces conference in San Jose in September. Good crowd of speakers including yours truly.

As Tyler Bell of Yahoo! is quoted on the website:

“I’m delighted to see this focus on an holistic location aware experience and business. The future of geo technologies has very much outgrown its origins in the traditional automotive sector.”

Now you’re 5…

When you’re 5 years old you get asked questions like “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Well, OpenStreetMap is 5 years old and there are a few answers to that question. But maybe a good first answer would be “banned on Google Enterprise maps”. You must of made an impact by then, huh? And yes, it’s true!

[...] You agree not to, and not to allow third parties or Your End Users, to use the Services or Content: [...] to use or display Tele Atlas’ US Address Points obtained from the Services on a base map comprised of map data or content provided by International Publishers NV, NavNGo Kft., NAVTEQ Corporation, OpenStreetMap Foundation, or Zenrin Co., Ltd. [...]

Check it out on the Google Maps API Premier Acceptable Use Policy.

OpenStreetMap server upgrades

Last weekend the OSM servers received a major reorganisation, tidy and new machines including beasts like the new tile server yevaud which has ‘only’ 24Gb of RAM and a few terabytes of storage. You can read more about what was done on the wiki page.

Here you can see the internet’s Matt Amos opening the new boxes:

Matt Amos opening server boxes

And here the interwebs Andy Allan of OpenCycleMap fame in an action shot:

Andy Allan

Two days of hard work led to some super professional server cabinets all neatly stashed and humming away:

OSM servers!

As well as Matt and Andy, Grant Slater (see more below), Cragg Nilson, Kai, Frederik Ramm and Dave Stubbs all helped out so big thanks to them!

Whilst at the OSM 5th Anniversary Party I had the chance to chat with a number of people and put together some videos using the awesome Flip HD camera (Amazon UK, Amazon US). The first of which is below where I talk to Grant. You can watch it online on youtube or watch it on your iPod here. Remember you can catch all these media things with the podcast link at the top right of the site.

Pocket Lint OSM article

I did an interview at the excellent Fire Station Pub in London last week, you can check it out here

The brilliant part about crowd sourcing mapping data is that, unlike Wikipedia articles, there’s less of a chance of bias. There’s no opinion involved. Either a road is there or it isn’t. The only issues have been over road naming in the disputed area of Northern Cyprus and the odd bit of accidental map graffiti.

Map of OSM mailing list posts

Super genius Matt Amos built this map of OSM mailing list activity:

Map of OSM mailing list activity

It shows first where we have mailing lists and second the level of activity in terms of number of posts per month.

jump_2009q2_combined_percapita

And this one shows the posts per capita measured in posts per million people.

So the clear disparities are there, but we can fix them and begin to build communities across all those grey areas.