Monthly Archives: May 2010

London Computational Knowledge Summit

This should be interesting as wolframalpha expands its use of map data

> London Computational Knowledge Summit to Introduce Wolfram|Alpha
> Technology to Enterprise Data
>> Wolfram|Alpha, a website that provides free access to
> computational knowledge, is hosting a one-day event in London on
> 9 June 2010 to introduce the idea of computational knowledge as
> part of enterprise infrastructure. The London Computational
> Knowledge Summit will share the insights of well-known experts on
> the problems of knowledge management as well as the experiences
> of key Wolfram|Alpha developers applying the new ideas of
> computational knowledge.
> http://www.computationalknowledge.org.uk
>> “Just making data available doesn’t make it practically usable.
> Inside businesses or as a citizen, people need answers to their
> questions, not raw data for them to sit and analyse,” says Conrad
> Wolfram, Strategic Director of Wolfram Research. “With the right
> interface and automation, computation can bridge this gap,
> democratising analysis and access.”
>> Speakers will include:
> * Stephen Wolfram (by video conference), Founder and CEO, Wolfram
> Research and Wolfram Alpha LLC
> * Andrew Dilnot, Principal, St Hughes College
> * John D Barrow, Professor, University of Cambridge
> * Conrad Wolfram, Strategic Director, Wolfram Research
>> Topics covered will include:
> * Delivering knowledge-based computing to everyone
> * Democratising high-level computation
> * Automating custom answer generation from data
> * Changing technical communication with computable documents
> * Impact on education and skills priorities in the computational
> knowledge economy
> * Integrating knowledge computing into an enterprise strategy
>> About Wolfram Research
>> Wolfram Research, Inc. is a powerhouse in technical innovation
> and pursues a long-term vision to develop the science,
> technology, and tools to make computation an ever-more-potent
> force in today’s and tomorrow’s world. The company is the
> developer of Mathematica, the world’s most powerful global
> computation system, now used by millions around the world, and
> Wolfram|Alpha, the widely used and continually growing
> computational knowledge engine. Wolfram Research also maintains
> the world’s largest free network of technical information
> websites, including MathWorld–the #1 website devoted to
> mathematics–and the Wolfram Demonstrations Project. For more
> information, visit the company website:
> http://www.wolfram.com
>> About Wolfram Alpha LLC
>> Wolfram Alpha LLC is a Wolfram Research company. Wolfram|Alpha’s
> long-term goal is to make all systematic knowledge immediately
> computable and accessible to everyone. The company aims to
> collect and curate all objective data; implement every known
> model, method, and algorithm; and make it possible to compute
> whatever can be computed about anything. Wolfram|Alpha builds on
> the achievements of science, and other systematizations of
> knowledge, to provide a single source that can be relied on by
> everyone for definitive answers to factual queries. Wolfram|Alpha
> was created with Mathematica–itself the result of more than 20
> years of development at Wolfram Research–and is being developed
> by a world-class team of experts led by Stephen Wolfram, a
> distinguished scientist, inventor, author, and business leader.
>> Explore Wolfram|Alpha at its website:
> http://www.wolframalpha.com

FutureEverything Conference

> Drew writes…
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> FutureEverything Conference #futr
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>> The FutureEverything conference for 2010 is our best and most ambitious yet. We are also delighted to present the world’s best speakers under our conference themes of ImagineEverything, Unlimited Connectivity, Open Data and The City Experiment.
>> 13-14 May 2010
> Contact, Oxford Road
> Manchester England
>> The FutureEverything conference will take you on a journey through the most cutting-edge developments in a range of exciting fields. Join us to hear about why governments should open up the data that they hold, and what we can do with this information to change our lives. Listen to leading artists and scientists discuss what we can dream and do with unlimited bandwidth. Visionary speakers will illuminate the science of the web, the ways the networked city is being rewired, how poetry can be encoded into DNA, ways we can play the city like an instrument, and how relationships between generations are going to change over the next hundred years.>> http://futureeverything.org/conference
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> GloNet – Globally Networked Event
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>> We are delighted to premiere GloNet, a new type of Globally Networked Event, shifting from a single city festival to one taking place simultaneously at cities around the globe using experimental formats. FutureEverything is inter-connecting Manchester and four cities around the globe: Sendai, (Japan), Istanbul (Turkey), Sao Paulo (Brazil) and Vancouver (Canada). Deeply connected to our The City Experiment theme, each host city will dynamically describe their views on the core issues facing cities today, from the question of growth to the possibilities of open data, to the impact of the creative industries and urban fragility. Tune in to the new reality of global connection.
>> Featuring: Adam Greenfield, John Worthington, Nigel Shadbolt, and many more from all over the world.>> http://futureeverything.org/festival2010/glonet2010
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> ImagineEverything
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>> Our most daring and wide-ranging conference strand, bringing you insights into the science of the web, the future of inter-generational communication, open source design, crowdsourced activism, and the future of music. Taking all of our wildest dreams for the future and imagining what would happen if they really came true is at the heart of this strand.>> Featuring: Dame Wendy Hall, Keri Facer, Alexandra Deschamps-Sonsino, and more.
>> http://futureeverything.org/conference/imagineeverything
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> The City Experiment
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>> The City Experiment conference strand explores urban transformation, in all its forms, especially how we work, play, create and relate with one another. Our urban spaces are massive laboratories, where we all are simultaneously discovering new possibilities for social connection and expression. At a time when Manchester is home to the biggest experiment in Europe in creating a future city, we are bringing you the most visionary thinkers who will tell us how cities are evolving and being rewired.>> Featuring: Ben Cerveny, Maarten Hajer, Francis McKee, Shawn Micallef, and more.>> http://futureeverything.org/conference/thecityexperiment
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> Open Data
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>> In 2009 FutureEverything embarked on an ambitious programme to open up the City of Manchester’s publicly held datasets for the benefit of the residents, businesses and institutions of Manchester. The panels in our Open Data conference strand will deeply reflect on the phenomenal potential impact of opening up data held by our public institutions in a usable form.>> Featuring: Nigel Shadbolt, Will Perrin, Emer Coleman, and more.
>> http://futureeverything.org/conference/opendata
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> Infinite Bandwidth
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>> Millions of internet users are accustomed to the always-on connection to the internet that broadband allows. The growing spread of fast connectivity empowers more and more people to create and express in ways previously unimagined. What does our future of unlimited bandwidth look like, and what will be the Wikipedias and YouTubes of this brave new future?>> Featuring: Ken Eason, Clem Herman, Brian Condon, and more.
>> http://futureeverything.org/conference/connectivity
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> FutureEverything 2010 – Tickets and Info
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>> Part of the Lever Prize winning FutureEverything: astonishing talks, visionary people in a global conversation on bringing the future into the present.>> The Festival Pass is the gateway to the FutureEverything festival and conference. Available at the pre-booking Rate rate of £135 till 11 May.>> http://futureeverything.org/tickets
>> For more information about FutureEverything 2010 please visit http://futureeverything.org.
>

Image of the Week: OSM data on GPS

Media_httpwikiopenstr_kwbki

Survey points and topology, one of many map styles available for
Garmin GPS receivers. More great details, en français, here:
http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/User:Petrovsk/FR:My_Garmin_map_styles

This is a Featured image, which means that it has been identified as
one of the best examples of OpenStreetMap mapping, or that it provides
a useful illustration of the OpenStreetMap project.

If you know another image of similar quality, you can nominate it on
Featured image proposals.
http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Featured_image_proposals

Project of the Week: 02 May 2010 – “What’s in a Name?”

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.” –Juliet

What is in the name tagss of OpenStreetMap? In most cases, the name
tag holds the default name of an object. Very often this is the text
from the sign attached to the object. We even have name:?? to
describe names in different languages so that we can create maps for
many users in many places.

The big name fixup

But there are names that are in error in OpenStreetMap. And some of
them are fairly easy to clear up, if you know that they are a problem.
Consider some of the longest name fields in OSM. From the examples
below we can see that some of the longest names in OSM include
needless duplication.

Learn how you can find errant long names and how you can fix them from
the OpenStreetMap wiki.
http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Project_of_the_week/2010/May_02